What Data Insights Can Mean for True Connected Care



March 16, 2022 12:20 pm

Paul Berney, Chief Marketing Officer at Anthropos, provides insight into the very real impacts of data when its part of a connected care system.

In my previous post I established that all Connected Care Platforms work in a similar way; they use internet enabled or smart devices and sensors placed around a home to generate data that can give care providers and family members a view of what is happening in the home of the older person.

That view can cover one or more of four different elements of life in the home:

  • The environment the person is living in (for example the temperature in the rooms)
  • The behaviour of the person (for example what time they got out of bed)
  • The physiological wellbeing of the person (for example how often they use the kettle or microwave)
  • The safety and security of the person (for example of their doors are locked)

But providing data alone is of limited value.

The most advanced Connected Care Platforms do more than just provide a data stream, they turn that data into actionable insights.

Think of it like this, the devices and sensors placed in the home can at a basic level provide a notification of an event occurring, such as ‘kettle boiled’ or ‘door opened’. Notifications of this sort could have value if perhaps a care provider was only looking for alerts that they needed to respond to, such as a front door opening during the night in the home of an older person with dementia. But what care providers really want to know is: what is the daily routine of my client? Is the data telling me something has changed? Is that change meaningful?

By building a more complete picture of the daily routine of an older person, connected care can be used to identify meaningful changes in patterns of behaviour by comparing any action noted to previous behaviour. In this way, the platform can infer change not just by what happens, but by what hasn’t happened, so that a kettle only being boiled once in a day for example, can be compared to previous days averages. If the previous days and weeks show an average of five kettle boils a day and now the client has dropped to once a day for three days in a row, that might be cause for concern. Similarly, if neither the front or back door has been opened for five days in between carer or family visits, then there may be concerns that the older person is becoming more socially isolated.

What care providers should be focussing on when deciding on which Connected Care Platform to use, is what is the usefulness of the intelligence the platform provides and will it help me understand the needs of my clients better? Can it uncover changes in behaviour that suggest we should take action sooner rather than later to avoid something else more serious going wrong?

To hear more from Anthropos around connected care on Day 1 on the Innovation stage and on Day 2 in an interactive Knowledge and Networking session.

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